March 5–8, 2014 - Atlanta, GA

SIGCSE 2014 Keynote Speakers


Robert M. Panoff, founder & executive director, Shodor Education Foundation

Robert M. Panoff

Opening Keynote: Thursday, March 6, 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Talk Abstract: Computational Thinking for All: The Power and the Peril

Students and faculty alike at all education levels are clearly spending much more of their time interacting with computing and communication tools than with each other. Is this good? Are all uses of computational technology in education helpful, and if not, how does one separate the benefits from the burdens? We ill explore how this technology enables multiple representations in the sciences, arts, and humanities, giving us the opportunity to be more fully human as we seek new knowledge in service to society. Moving "beyond PowerPointless-ness," we have the opportunity to demonstrate that computing really matters in teaching and learning. Computing "matters" because quantitative reasoning, computational thinking, and multi-scale modelling are the intellectual "heart and soul" of 21st Century science and therefore are the essential skills of the 21st Century workforce. Computing "matters" because we can apply the power of dynamic, visual, and interactive computing to reach a deeper understanding of models across math and science while exploring their role in understanding our world.

Biography:

Dr. Robert M. Panoff is founder and Executive Director of Shodor, a non-profit education and research corporation in Durham, NC, dedicated to reform and improvement of mathematics and science education through appropriate computational and communication technologies. As PI on several National Science Foundation (NSF) and US Department of Education grants that explore interactions between technology and education, he develops interactive simulation modules that combine standards, curriculum, supercomputing resources and desktop computers. In recognition of Dr. Panoff's efforts in college faculty enhancement and curriculum development, Shodor was named as a NSF Foundation Partner for the revitalization of undergraduate education. In 1998, Shodor established the Shodor Computational Science Institute, which was expanded with NSF funding in 2001 to become the National Computational Science Institute (NCSI). Shodor’s Computational Science Education Reference Desk (CSERD) serves more than 4 million webviews per month as a Pathway portal of the National Science Digital Library. Dr. Panoff consults at several national laboratories and is a frequent presenter at NSF workshops on visualization, supercomputing, and networking. Dr. Panoff received his M.A. and Ph.D. in theoretical physics from Washington University in St. Louis, with both pre- and postdoctoral work at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University. In 2005 Wofford College awarded Dr. Panoff an honorary Doctor of Science degree in recognition of his leadership in computational science education.


Andrea Lawrence, Associate Professor and Chair of Computer Science, Spelman College

Winner of 2014 SIGCSE Award for Lifetime Service to Computer Science Education

Andrea Lawrence

First-Timers' Lunch Keynote: Thursday, March 6, 12:00 PM - 1:45 PM

Talk Abstract:

Students and faculty alike at all education levels are clearly spending much more of their time interacting with computing and communication tools than with each other. Is this good? Are all uses of computational technology in education helpful, and if not, how does one separate the benefits from the burdens? We ill explore how this technology enables multiple representations in the sciences, arts, and humanities, giving us the opportunity to be more fully human as we seek new knowledge in service to society. Moving "beyond PowerPointless-ness," we have the opportunity to demonstrate that computing really matters in teaching and learning. Computing "matters" because quantitative reasoning, computational thinking, and multi-scale modelling are the intellectual "heart and soul" of 21st Century science and therefore are the essential skills of the 21st Century workforce. Computing "matters" because we can apply the power of dynamic, visual, and interactive computing to reach a deeper understanding of models across math and science while exploring their role in understanding our world.

Biography:

Andrea Lawrence is Associate Professor and Chair of Computer Science at Spelman College, a liberal arts, historically Black college for women in Atlanta, GA. Andrea Lawrence received her B.S. degree in mathematics from Purdue University, and her Ph.D. in computer science from the Georgia Institute of Technology. She was the first African American to receive the Ph.D. in computer science from Georgia Tech. A member of the Spelman College faculty for 30 years, she teaches a wide variety of courses and supervises independent study projects in the areas of human computer interaction and remote sensing related to Antarctic ice. Dr. Lawrence has worked with the Computing Educators Oral History Project (CEOHP) and the History Makers. One of her main interests is increasing the number of minority students and women who pursue graduate degrees in computer science. Thus, she has been involved in a number of mentoring activities including the Academic Alliance of NCWIT and the STARS Alliance. She has also been involved with two other broadening participation activities, the ARTSI Alliance and Spelman SpelBots. She is immediate past president of the Association of Departments of Computer Science/Engineering at Minority Institutions (ADMI).


Hadi Partovi, co-founder & CEO, Code.org

Hadi Partovi

Friday, March 7, 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Talk Abstract: Transforming US Education with Computer Science

Code.org first exploded on the CS education scene in Feb 2013 with its first video featuring Mark Zuckerberg and Bill Gates talking about computer science. 10 months later, it launched an Hour of Code campaign that has taken the world by storm. Reaching 10 million students in just 3 days, the Hour of Code became the fastest-spreading service in the history of technology OR education. Code.org founder Hadi Partovi will talk about how he came up with the concepts behind these grassroots campaigns, and how Code.org hopes to harness the reach of the broader CS community to grow computer science education in schools.

Biography:

Hadi is an entrepreneur and investor, and also co-founder of education non-profit Code.org. As an entrepreneur, he was on the founding teams of Tellme and iLike. As an angel investor and startup advisor, Hadi’s portfolio includes Facebook, Zappos, Dropbox, OPOWER, Flixster, Bluekai, and many others.

A graduate of Harvard University, Hadi began his career during the browser wars in the 1990s, when he was Microsoft’s Group Program Manager for Internet Explorer. After the release of IE 5.0, Hadi co-founded Tellme Networks. Tellme was acquired by Microsoft for a reported $800 million. Hadi was General Manager of MSN.com during MSN’s only year of profit, where he delivered 30% annual growth and incubated Start.com (now Live.com).

After leaving Microsoft a second time, Hadi co-founded iLike with twin brother Ali Partovi, and together they built the leading music application on the Facebook platform. In 2009, iLike was acquired by MySpace where both Partovis worked as Senior Vice Presidents.

Hadi is a strategic advisor to numerous startups including Facebook, Dropbox, OPOWER, and Bluekai, and serves on the board of TASER International. He is also an active angel investor with a wide range of investments.


A.J. Brush, Senior Researcher Microsoft Research

A.J. Brush

SIGCSE Luncheon and Keynote: Saturday, March 8, 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Talk Abstract: Lab of Things: a Devices Research and Teaching Platform for Home and Beyond

Inspired by the availability of inexpensive connected devices—such as lights, water sensors, security cameras, power meters, and thermostats—we built the Lab of Things (LoT) platform to enable easy interaction with devices for a range of applications, including automation, security, energy management, and elder care. Our goal is to substantially lower the barrier for researchers and students to develop and experiment with new technologies for the home environment. LoT provides a common framework to write applications that use connected devices and includes a set of cloud services that enable remote command/control of devices, monitoring of system health, and data collection. We released the LoT SDK in July 2013 for non-commercial use. I will describe he research studies that motivated the development of Lab of Things, student and research projects developed using Lab of Things and its precursor HomeOS, and our long-term vision of research groups working together to create a test bed of homes around the world that are willing to participate in field studies.

Biography:

A.J. Bernheim Brush is a Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research. A.J.’s research area is Human-Computer Interaction with a focus on Ubiquitous Computing and Computer Supported Collaboration (CSCW). A.J. is most well known for her research on technologies for families and her expertise conducting field studies of technology. Her current focus is home automation as co-leader of the Lab of Things project. She is a Senior Member of the ACM and was honored to receive a Borg Early Career Award in 2010. Her research has received 2 best paper awards and several best paper nominations. A.J. is co-general chair of biComp 2014, and serves on the UbiComp Steering Committee and the CRA-W board. A.J. also serves regularly on Program Committees for many conferences including UbiComp, Pervasive, CHI, and CSCW.