March 5–8, 2014 - Atlanta, GA

SIGCSE 2014 Supporter Sessions

We invite you to review the supporter sessions on our symposium program, and create your own personalized program. Please note that some materials will continue to be updated as information becomes available.

  • Google

    Session times:

    • Thursday, 10:45 AM – 12:00 pm * There will be two topics discussed in this session. Please see below for details.
    • Friday, 1:45 PM – 3:00 pm
  • Microsoft

    Session times:

    • Thursday, 10:45 AM – 12:00 pm
    • Friday, 10:45 am –12:00 pm
  • ABET

    Session time:

    • Thursday, 1:45 PM – 3:00 PM
  • Oracle

    Session time:

    • Saturday, 9:00 am – 10:15 am
  • GitHub

    Session time:

    • Saturday, 10:45 am- 12:00 pm

Session Details

Google Sessions:

Please see below for the full speaker biographies.

  1. The Engagement and Retention of Students in Undergraduate Computer Science Programs

    Thursday, March 6, 2014, 10:45 AM-11:20 AM

    Speakers:  Leslie Yeh Johnson, Cameron Fadjo, Beth Quinn, Lecia Barker

    Abstract: The 2013 Taulbee report shows the fifth straight year of increased CS enrollment rates, this year at 26.9%. New initiatives are driving further growth and broader interest from women and underrepresented minorities. Retaining these students is important for the economy, national security, and equity. Research on retention in CS shows that meaningful and relevant examples used in class, assignments, and curriculum are the strongest predictor of retention. Research also shows that students with limited programming experience, a group to which a majority of women recruits belong, are at greatest risk of leaving CS after the first year. Additionally, the incoming CS students will have a broad set of interests due to the importance of computation in a rapidly expanding number of fields. Providing learning materials that are especially engaging to inexperienced students will be important for retention, and effective scaling strategies will ensure that all interested students can participate in CS programs.

    Come join an introduction to Google’s new program, Engage CSed.  Engage CSed aims to retain Computer Science undergraduates.

    Prepare for influx of undergraduate Computer Science students. Participants will learn how we plan to achieve these aims by providing open content for introductory sequence courses that is effective in engaging and retaining all students, including women. We also plan to support scaling strategies designed to meet the educational needs of a growing Computer Science student population.  We look forward to hearing from educators working on these issues.

  2. CS First

    Thursday, March 6, 2014, 11:25 AM-12:00 PM

    Speakers:  Kate Berrio, Matthew Dawson and Jamie Sue Goodman

    Abstract: CS First provides teachers and volunteers with the curriculum and supporting materials to lead a CS program focused on building student courage and confidence while also instilling curiosity. Students jump into new computing experiences, develop perseverance and learn the debugging mindset while exposed to basic coding concepts using tools including Scratch and App Inventor. The curriculum is designed for 4th-12th grade students with no programming experience. Session participants will learn how Google is working with both teachers and non-teacher volunteers within South Carolina schools to scale this pilot program.  Participants will also gain access to teacher developed resources that they can bring back to their classroom or share with others.

  3. Disruptive Innovation in CS Education

    Friday, March 7, 2014, 1:45-3:00 PM

     

    Speakers:   Pam Fox, Maggie Johnson, Michael Lach (mod.), Jane Margolis, and Hadi Partovi

    High school and college students have been studying computer science for 50 years (e.g., see http://www.iit.edu/csl/cs/about/pdf/high_school_students_use_computers1964.pdf), but this year marks what looks to be a huge and important inflection point in computer science education. In this panel session four people who have each played a significant role as disruptive innovators for computer science education discuss how their ideas and work have been combined with those of the entire community to position us for momentous and important change.

    We will hear from each of them about their goals, visions, and aspirations for computer science education; what each is working on as part of realizing these; and how they see their contributions meshing with the community working toward a bright, near-term future.

Microsoft Supporter Session

    Building touch apps from millimeters to yards

    Thursday, March 6, 2014, 10:45 AM-12:00 PM

    Speaker: Martin Schray, Sr. Technical Evangelist, Microsoft

    Abstract:Did you know that Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 share the same OS Kernel?  Or that Windows 8 can run on both Intel and ARM based systems?    Or apps written in a single language run on both Intel and ARM processors and that you can write HTML 5/JavaScript apps for Windows 8?

     The same kernel runs on Windows Phone, 8.1 inch Windows Tablets to 82 inch Perceptive Pixel touch screens (and everything in between).  How did Microsoft do this? In this session learn how Microsoft architected the OS Kernel, programming languages and tools to enable apps to run on such a variety of devices.  We’ll explore the technology, approaches and tools allowing developers to pick C++, C# or JavaScript/HTML to build their apps.  Finally, we’ll explore how to develop portable code that will work on Windows Phone 8 to 82 inch Perceptive Pixel touch screen devices.

  1. TouchDevelop – Migrating from block to text programming

    Friday, March 7, 2014, 10:45 AM-12:00 PM

    Speaker: Peli de Halleux, Microsoft Research

    Abstract:The way in which we interact with computing devices is changing: instead of keyboards, advanced touchscreens become more common; mobile devices are often equipped with more sensors, such as location information and acceleration, and devices are connected to the cloud and constantly sharing data.  TouchDevelop is a programming environment and language built around this new reality.

    You will also learn how to transition from a block programming environment, such as Scratch, into TouchDevelop, a text programming environment. With its typed, structured programming, TouchDevelop allows students to create text-based code without having the syntax in their way. Yet, TouchDevelop is a general purpose programming environment that allows students to create exciting cross-platform apps! You also will learn how 130,000 participants earned more than 800,000 trophies with TouchDevelop during the 2013 Hour Of Code. TouchDevelop provides an adaptive tutorial engine to guide the participants through their first experience of coding with high success rate.

ABET Supporter Session

  1. The Benefits of ABET Accreditation to a Quality Computing Program (Panel Session)

    Thursday, March 6, 2014, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM

    Moderator: David Cordes, Professor and Department Head, Department of Computer Science, University of Alabama.  ABET CAC Chair for 2013-2014.

    Abstract: Participants at SIGCSE all believe in providing a quality educational experience to their students.   ABET identifies itself as Assuring Quality and Stimulating Innovation.  The panel, with both academic and industrial members, will discuss questions such as does ABET accreditation matter to your students and potential employers of your students and how much overhead is associated with accreditation efforts, and what is the perceived return-on-investment for these efforts.

    Panelists:
    • Cary Laxer, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
    • Dan Lopresti, Lehigh University
    • Donna Reese, Mississippi State University

Oracle Supporter Session

Please see below for the full speaker biographies.

  1. The Integration of Computer Science into English, and History, and Science...Oh My!

    Saturday, 9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

    Speaker: Nancy Hoffman, Oracle Academy

    Abstract: This presentation engages participants with little or no programming experience to understand how basic Java programming concepts can be integrated with a research project in any subject. The presenter will use Carnegie Melon’s Alice platform to do something f un – create an animated game to present research findings. By dragging and dropping graphic tiles that contain standard Java programming statements, the presenter will demonstrate a game that animates 3D objects in an engaging way to present a final research project.

    Intended Audience: K-12 Teachers with little or no Computer Science experience, Administrators, Technology Integration Specialists

    Presenter background and presentation experience: Nancy Hoffman is currently a Curriculum Developer for the Oracle Academy, Oracle's Computer Science education initiative. Prior to her employment with Oracle in 2013, she was a Computer Science and Mathematics teacher for 14 years at Trinity Area High School in Washington, PA, where she also served on the Technology Committee and as a Technology Integration Specialist. Her Computer Science teaching experience includes: Scratch; App Inventor; Alice; Java; Processing; AP Computer Science; Linux; Oracle Academy Database Design; Oracle Academy Database Programming with SQL; BASIC; Visual BASIC; C++; Python; Pascal. For nine years, she was an Instructor for the Oracle Academy where she taught Database Design and Programming topics to high school and college teachers in North America, Asia, and Europe. In addition, she has worked for Google as Lead Faculty for Google’s Computing and Programming Experience (CAPE) program. Her conference presentations focus on how to integrate Computer Science concepts into other areas of curriculum. She has a BS in Computer Science from the University of Pittsburgh, and currently resides in Albright, WV.

GitHub Supporter Session(s)

  1. Version Control with GitHub: A foundation of collaboration

    Saturday, March 8, 2014, 10:45 AM-12:00 PM

    Speaker: Matthew McCullough, Trainer, GitHub

    Abstract: In the domain of computer science education, there is a challenge of what can be fit into a given degree program. The inclusion is often ranked by the potential value of a topic as an underpinning of future CS research, computing skills, required employment knowledge, and helpfulness during a student's university years. Version control is a domain that has benefits in all those aforementioned categories, and is evolving from a mere tracking of changes to the fundamental platform on which software collaboration happens at both small and large scale.

    In these 70 minutes of exposition and live demos, come see what Git, a modern version control system, brings to a daily software development workflow. Matthew will show how, with the adoption of best practices like solid tests and continuous integration, a third layer of software quality can be obtained by having a polished history of commits, atomically grouping related work, and in an order that makes later review of the code base much easier under production-system duress.

    Matthew will tie everything together with a look at how these features are a platform for collaborative light weight code review, starting from a unique "README-driven-development" approach, and flowing all the way through to pushing to in-house or cloud-based production systems.


Speaker Biographies

Google

Lecia Barker, Associate Professor, School of Information, University of Texas at Austin

Lecia Barker conducts research and evaluation in attracting, retaining, and advancing groups underrepresented in professional computing and science careers. These studies focus on social climate, identity/belonging, faculty adoption of alternative teaching and curricular practices, and sustainable organizational change. Barker also serves as Senior Research Scientist, National Center for Women &s; IT.

Kate Berrio, Program Manager, Google CS First

Kate Berrio manages the CS First program for Google, based out of South Carolina, managing external communications and partnerships for local after school programs in CS Education. Before championing this effort, Berrio led Google’s University Programs team in East and Latin America regions, and ran programs for the Research at Google academic community. Kate holds a BA in Psychology from Seattle University and an MA in International Education from NYU.

Matthew Dawson, Teaching Fellow, Google CS First

Matthew develops and implements computer science curricula for students in grades 4-12 in South Carolina. His work focuses on improving access to computer science education through equitable and scalable programs.   Before Google, Dawson taught fourth and fifth grade in South Chicago, IL.  He has a BS in Elementary Education from Illinois State University and a MS in Higher Education Administration and Policy from Northwestern University.

JamieSue Goodman, Technical Program Manager, Google CS First

JamieSue Goodman leads the Google CS First program in South Carolina creating scalable computer science curriculum for after school programs and collecting classroom data on course effectiveness. Prior to CS First, Goodman managed data quality analysis and improvement in Google Maps and served as the Director of Technology at Zagat Survey where she helped design software to scale the content creation process.

Leslie Yeh Johnson, University Relations Manager, Google Inc

Leslie Yeh Johnson manages Google's University Relations core team. In addition to building research relationships with East Coast universities, she also founded Google's Fellowship and Digital Humanities Awards programs. Prior to joining the Research group, she was a founding member of the Mountain View, New York and Cambridge product management teams  at Google, working with  Google AdWords, Developer APIs and Google Book Search products. Before Google, Johnson served as  a Program Manager at Microsoft and shipped major releases within MSN and Windows. Leslie received her BA in Computer Science from Harvard in 2000.

Maggie Johnson, Director of Education and University Relations

Maggie Johnson is Director of Education and University Relations for Google. She manages all technical training and content development, and information management programs for Google engineers and operations staff, as well as Google’s K12 educational programs in STEM and computer science. She also manages the University Relations area, building strategic research partnerships with faculty and labs globally. Prior to Google, Maggie was a faculty member and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Computer Science at Stanford University.

Jane Margolis  Senior Researcher, Graduate School of Education &s; Information Studies, UCLA

Dr. Margolis is a Senior Researcher at the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies and a social scientist who focuses on educational inequity and segregation. For the last 15 years she has studied the low numbers of females and students of color in computer science. She is the Principal Investigator of several large grants looking at this problem, being supported by the National Science Foundation, the Sloan Foundation, Google, and Microsoft. She is the author of two award-winning books on this topic: Unlocking the Clubhouse: Women in Computing (MIT Press, 2002) and Stuck in the Shallow End: Education, Race, and Computing (MIT Press, 2008). She was honored with the 2005 Computing Research Association Habermann award for Diversity "because of the way she uses her research to inform ongoing interventions; she is committed both to rigorous research and to making important changes in society."

Hadi Partovi, Co-Founder, Code.org

Hadi is an entrepreneur and investor, and also co-founder of education non-profit Code.org. As an entrepreneur, he was on the founding teams of Tellme and iLike. As an angel investor and startup advisor, Hadi’s portfolio includes Facebook, Zappos, Dropbox, OPOWER, Flixster, Bluekai, and many others. A graduate of Harvard University, Hadi began his career during the browser wars in the 1990s, when he was Microsoft’s Group Program Manager for Internet Explorer. After the release of IE 5.0, Hadi co-founded Tellme Networks. Tellme was acquired by Microsoft for a reported $800 million. Hadi was General Manager of MSN.com during MSN’s only year of profit, where he delivered 30% annual growth and incubated Start.com (now Live.com). Hadi is a strategic advisor to numerous startups including Facebook, Dropbox, OPOWER, and Bluekai, and serves on the board of TASER International. He is also an active angel investor with a wide range of investments.

Pamela Fox, Khan Academy

Pamela was born to a duo of Computer Scientists who told her that she could learn programming without their help, thanks to the internet! Now that she's at Khan Academy, she works to improve the CS curriculum to make that true. On the side, Pamela teaches web development workshops for GirlDevelopIt and writes programs to figure out her next hair color. Before Khan, she worked at Coursera and Google.

Michael Lach Director of STEM Policy and Strategic Initiatives, University of Chicago

Michael Lach leads local, regional and national leadership on STEM education and policy initiatives while working with the leadership at Urban Education Institute (UEI) and the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) at the University of Chicago. Prior to UEI, Lach lead science and mathematics education efforts at the Department of Education under US Secretary Arne Duncan and served as CPS Officer of Teaching and Learning in Chicago, overseeing curriculum and instruction in over 600 schools. Lach is a former high school Biology and General Science teacher and rose through the ranks via Teach for America where he was a charter member and later directed Program Design for the organization. Over the past 20 years, Lach has served as an Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow, was named Illinois Physics Teacher of the Year, and led curriculum development for Center for Learning Technologies in Urban Schools at Northwestern University. Lach earned a B.A. in Physics from Carleton College, an M.A. in Science Education from the Teachers College of Columbia University, and an M.S. in Education Leadership from Northwestern University.

Cameron Fadjo, Program Manager, Google

Cameron Fadjo is a Program Manager working on Computer Science Education Initiatives at Google. As part of the engineering education team, Cameron supports the development of various external-facing K-16 CS education programs and is a Project Faculty member on the Engage CSed project. Prior to joining Google, Cameron led the design and development of a large-scale CS education initiative within the NYC Department of Education, researched how novice programmers learn novel abstract concepts at Columbia University, and taught computing at a public middle school. Cameron has a Ph.D. in cognition and the learning sciences from Columbia University and a B.M. in Music Synthesis from Berklee College of Music.

Beth A. Quinn, Director of Extension Services for Undergraduate Programs, NCWIT

Dr. Quinn recently joined the National Center for Women and Information Technology as Director of Extension Services for Undergraduate Programs. She holds an interdisciplinary social science Ph.D. from the University of California-Irvine. In her research Beth has sought to understand how formal policies are implemented in complex organizations, and in particular, how these policies interact with informal norms and social identities. Beth comes to NCWIT/UTA from Filament Games, a leading developer of educational video games where she directed research and early stage product development. Before Filament, Dr. Quinn was a tenured Associate Professor of Sociology at Montana State University.

Oracle

Nancy Hoffman, Curriculum Developer, Oracle Academy

Nancy Hoffman is currently a Curriculum Developer for the Oracle Academy, Oracle's Computer Science education initiative. Prior to her employment with Oracle in 2013, she was a Computer Science and Mathematics teacher for 14 years at Trinity Area High School in Washington, PA, where she also served on the Technology Committee and as a Technology Integration Specialist. Her Computer Science teaching experience includes: Scratch; App Inventor; Alice; Java; Processing; AP Computer Science; Linux; Oracle Academy Database Design; Oracle Academy Database Programming with SQL; BASIC; Visual BASIC; C++; Python; Pascal. For nine years, she was an Instructor for the Oracle Academy where she taught Database Design and Programming topics to high school and college teachers in North America, Asia, and Europe. In addition, she has worked for Google as Lead Faculty for Google’s Computing and Programming Experience (CAPE) program. Her conference presentations focus on how to integrate Computer Science concepts into other areas of curriculum. She has a BS in Computer Science from the University of Pittsburgh, and currently resides in Albright, WV.